Carpenter ants of the united states and canada

Auteurs
Éditeurs
Parution
28/04/2005
Pages
224
Catégorie
Langue

Présentation

The carpenter ant is one of the most common and destructive pests affecting homes and businesses. However, in natural areas, these ants also play an important role in forest ecology: they break down dead wood and are the principal food source of the pileated woodpecker. In the first book devoted entirely to carpenter ants, Laurel D. Hansen and John H. Klotz cover the ants' life history and foraging behavior, then turn to their economic importance. The authors provide a comprehensive overview of carpenter ant ecology, morphology, taxonomy, and distribution as well as a detailed chapter on control and management that will appeal especially to urban pest control programs and pest management officials. Carpenter ants of the united states and canada is illustrated with distribution maps, 94 halftones, 52 line drawings, and 24 color plates on a four-page insert.

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Sommaire

  • xPreface
  • xiiAcknowledgments
  • CHAPTER 1. ECOLOGY
    • 3RELATIONSHIPS WITH OTHER ORGANISMS
      • 3Coexistence with Formica
      • 3Relationships with Birds
      • 4Trophobionts
      • 7Myrmecophiles
      • 17Other Parasites
      • 18Endosymbionts
      • 18Microbes in the Infrabuccal Chamber
    • 19NESTING SITES
    • 23REFERENCES CITED
  • 29CHAPTER 2. M RPHOLOGY
    • 31EXTERNAL MORPHOLOGY
    • 50INTERNAL MORPHOLOGY
      • 50Alimentary Canal
      • 53Digestive Glands
      • 54Circulatory System
      • 54Respiratory System
      • 54Nervous System
      • 57Reproductive Systems and Associated Glands
      • 60Exocrine Glands
    • 65REFERENCES CITED
  • 67CHAPTER 3. TAXONOMY AND DESTRIBUTION
    • 69DESCRIPTIONS OF SUBGENERA AND LISTS OF SPECIES
      • 69Subgenus Camponotus
      • 69Subgenus Colobopsis
      • 70Subgenus Myrmaphaenus
      • 70Subgenus MV1712entonia
      • 71Subgenus Mynnobrachys
      • 72Subgenus Myrmothrix
      • 79Subgenus Tanaemyrmex
    • 73SPECIES IN AND AROUND STRUCTURES
    • 75ILLUSTRATED KEY TO STRUCTURAL OR NUISANCE PESTS
    • 81DESCRIPTIONS AND DISTRIBUTIONS OF STRUCTURAL OR
      [h3]NUISANCE PESTS
      • 81Subgenus Camponotus
      • 87Subgenus Myrmentoma
      • 92Subgenus Myrmobrachys
      • 94Subgenus 114yrmothrix
      • 95Subgenus Thnaernyrmex
    • 100REFERENCES CITED
  • 103CHAPTER 4. LIFE IHSTORY
    • 103MATING FLIGHTS
    • 105INCIPIENT COLONIES
    • 110ESTABLISHED COLONIES
    • 117PARENT AND SATELLITE NESTS
    • 121COLONY GROWTH AND THE PRODUCTION OF ALATES
    • 122COLONY SIZE
    • 123POLYGYNY
    • 125COLONY INITIATION BY USURPATION
    • 125REFERENCES CITED
  • 129CHAPTER 5. FORAGING
    • 129TRAILS
      • 129Physical Trails of Carnponotus modoc
      • 131Construction by Camponotus mocloc
      • 135Chemical Trails and Recruitment
      • 136Orientation
    • 138FORAGING POPULATION
      • 139Size Differences in Workers
    • 140ACTIVITY RHYTHMS
      • 142Camponotus modoc
      • 143Other Species
    • 144FEEDING
      • 144Diet
      • 147Food Consumption
      • 147Trophallaxis
    • 149HOME RANGE
      • 150Size
      • 151Disputes
    • 153REFERENCES CITED
  • 157CHAPTER 6. ECONOMIC IMPORTANCE AND MANAGEMENT
    • 157AS STRUCTURAL PESTS
  • 160TYPES OF DAMAGE
    • 160Damage to Buildings and Property
    • 167Damage to Standing and Cut Timber
    • 168Other Damage
  • 170COSTS OF CONTROL
  • 170MANAGEMENT
    • 171New Construction
    • 175Maintenance of Structures
  • 181TREATMENT
    • 181Chemical Control
    • 186Baits
    • 188Cultural Control
    • 189Other Strategies
  • 192FOLLOW-UP EVALUATION
  • 192REFERENCES CITED
  • 197Index
  • 104Color plates follow page
  • Bibliothèque